The Justifiable Offer: Why A Low-Ball Is A Bad Idea

You’ve done the searches. You’ve analyzed your options. You’ve done a few conference calls with sellers and you think you’ve found the right business for you. Your next step is a big one, and your decisions here can absolutely make or break your chances of buying this business. It’s time to make an offer.

 

Your offer is important for a number of reasons. The offer you put together (if accepted) will become the purchase contract. This contract will include not just the final sale price but many other parts of the transaction that will need to be negotiated. Think the length of your training period, the terms of the deal and how existing contracts will be assigned – just to name a few.

 

This all-important document essentially contains all the parts of your deal that will need to be negotiated. The fluid nature of an initial offer/purchase contract means the first version – your version – is just a place to start those negotiations. It should go without saying that you need to start off on the right foot. 

 

 

The relationship you have with the seller, although not a permanent one, will be critical to the success or failure of your transaction. You have to talk to this person, meet with this person, iron out a deal with this person and then most likely work side by side with this person during your training period.

 

This is not a relationship you want to start with a perceived slap in the face.

 

What do we mean by that? You do not want to low-ball a seller just to see how desperate they are or how great of a deal you can get. People who intentionally low-ball business sellers aren’t business buyers. They’re tire-kickers. Your initial offer speaks volumes to a seller about how serious you are and what it’s like to work with you. You are making a financial offer for something that seller has invested countless hours in, has spent years building and has made sacrifices to maintain. Yes, business transactions shouldn’t be emotionally driven, but in the small business market it really can’t be helped. No one wants their blood, sweat and tears treated like a cheap car.

 

What should you do instead?

 

Make a JUSTIFIABLE offer.

 

A justifiable offer is a simple concept – it’s something based in reality and backed up by data. You’ve looked at the numbers, you’ve considered the current market and you’ve come up with a number that makes sense – not the lowest, rock-bottom price you’d love but something you feel (based on the data you have) is fair.

 

Making a fair offer tells a seller that although you may not want to give them their full asking price, you are a person interested in making a deal happen. You are someone who values their business and all they’ve invested. 

 

How do I make sure my initial offer is fair? Talk to your business broker about what you’d like to offer, and then listen to their advice. They know the market, and can give you insight into whether or not the number you’ve come up with will be a good point to start negotiations.

 

The message here is simple. If you are serious about buying a business the best way to start your transaction is by making a fair and justifiable offer. 

 

Have you looked at businesses and want to know more about how sellers come up with their listing price? Do you have questions about what an initial offer/purchase contract entails? Ask us! Leave any questions or comments and we would be happy to help.

 

 

 

Michael Monnot

941.518.7138
Mike@InfinityBusinessBrokers.com
5111 Ocean Boulevard, Suite E
Siesta Key, FL 34242

www.InfinityBusinessBrokers.com

No Comments »




Follow The Rules: How To Keep From Killing Your Deal

Buying a business can be (and often is) an intensely frustrating process. When you have questions, when negotiations are in full swing – even getting initial information usually means you spend a lot of time waiting. Waiting for the seller’s broker to contact the seller. Waiting for the seller to get together the documentation you’ve requested. Waiting for an attorney to look over a contract. Waiting for approval by your new commercial landlord. Waiting for licensing and permitting requirements to go through. It takes an enormous amount of personal patience to see it through.

 

This huge patience requirement can make you feel a little crazy – maybe even crazy enough to try and push the process along by yourself.

 

What do we mean by that?

 

The process of buying and selling businesses comes with a rather rigid set of rules. The majority of those rules seek to protect the deal on two fronts. They protect the confidentiality of the transaction itself and they protect the buyer and seller from each other.

 

Why does a transaction need confidentiality and why shouldn’t you push to break it? Breaching confidentiality might not only kill your deal, it could potentially cause a fatal blow to the business you are hoping to buy. Business sales happen under a strict veil of confidentiality for a few very important reasons.

 

The most important of these reasons is the incorrect but pervasive assumption that a business for sale is a business on the brink of failure. This notion can destroy a business if the news gets out that it’s on the market. Employees can panic and leave. Clients can cancel big contracts. It can be devastating. As a buyer you have to keep the for-sale status of prospective businesses under wraps. You will not only be required to sign non-disclosure agreements – you will be forbidden from talking to staff on your own, from emailing the owner directly (in many businesses the owner’s email is accessible to their staff), from calling the place of business and asking for the owner, from visiting the premises without permission, etc.

 

While it might be tempting to email or call the seller because you’re tired of waiting for the brokers and attorneys involved to get you the information you’ve been asking for – don’t. One seemingly insignificant point of contact can cause a disastrous cascade. The rules exist for a reason. You have to follow them.

 

This leads us to the second set of rules that protect the buyer and seller from each other. Even if you are following the rules that protect confidentiality to the letter, it might be tempting to bypass the intermediaries and talk one-on-one with the seller (if you somehow have their home phone number, for example). Don’t do this either.

 

Why?

 

The better question is why do the intermediaries, the business brokers, exist? They exist because the complex tangle of a business transaction requires experience and it also requires a buffer. A seller is selling their blood, sweat and tears – something that may be their life’s work. They have a deep personal connection to their business – and a buyer can quickly and easily derail a deal by asking the wrong question, by making an innocent assumption, by saying the wrong thing. Those questions and remarks can offend a seller to the point that they will refuse to work with you – and your deal is dead.

 

Follow the advice of your broker and keep the flow of communication between you and the seller flowing through the people who you hired to keep your deal on track. Negotiations are far easier when the seller is still willing to talk to you.

 

The message here is the rules that cover your business transaction are there for a reason. Someone, somewhere messed up their chances of becoming a business owner – and their cautionary tale will keep your deal safe.

 

Are you a business buyer who thinks the rules are a pain and want to know more about why they are so important? Do you have a story about a derailed deal that could have been protected? Please leave any questions or comments here, and we would be happy to help.

 

 

 

Michael Monnot

941.518.7138
Mike@InfinityBusinessBrokers.com
5111 Ocean Boulevard, Suite E
Siesta Key, FL 34242

www.InfinityBusinessBrokers.com

 

 

 

 

No Comments »




How To Buy The Family Business When You Aren’t Family

If you think about the quintessential small business, you likely see a family-run business – one owned by mom and dad and staffed by children and other family members. While the initial intent of many family business owners may have been to pass the business on to the next generation, there are many times when these family businesses go on the market instead.

 

 

A family business on the open market can be a good buy for a business buyer because they are typically run with a lot of drive, passion and care – all of which translates into a strong and successful bottom line.

 

Problems can arise, however, because the person buying the business isn’t a member of the family.

 

I’m looking at buying a family business, what problems might I face?

 

First, you may have a hard time keeping critical staff after the transition because those critical staff may be related to the original owners. The loyalty for those original owners can be hard to replicate, so you as a buyer need to make an effort to get to know each member of the family who works in the business (and plans on staying) and understand what their roles and responsibilities are. Building a good relationship with each family member will help to keep them on your payroll – and hopefully also keep their loyal clientele.

 

This leads us to our next issue. Many family businesses retain their customer base because that customer base has loyalty and trust for the family. As a new face within the business, you will need the current owners of the business to help you with maintaining that customer loyalty. You can work on customer retention by having the seller introduce you to important regular customers and by possibly keeping the seller on as a consultant for a time after you purchase the business. The key to a successful transition is consistency – which leads us to our last point.

 

The final problem many buyers run into when purchasing a family business? Making too many changes too fast. The business you are buying is successful because the family that runs it runs it in a specific way – a way that keeps the customer base happy. Every business buyer wants to make their own mark, but massive changes right out of the gate in an already successful business will more than likely end in disaster. Changes are possible, but a buyer needs to take the time to see what parts of the business work.

 

Buying a family business can pose a special set of challenges, but those challenges are worth it when family-run means a great buy.

 

Do you have questions about buying family-run businesses? Would you like to know what family businesses are currently on the market? Please feel free to leave questions or comments and we would be happy to help.

 

 

 

Michael Monnot

941.518.7138
Mike@InfinityBusinessBrokers.com
5111 Ocean Boulevard, Suite E
Siesta Key, FL 34242

www.InfinityBusinessBrokers.com

No Comments »




How To Get Your Deal To Close – Managing Reality and Expectations

No matter what the economic climate looks like, there are always businesses changing hands. Buyers and sellers are always working together – but even in the most favorable of circumstances some deals are destined to die. 

 

Why?

 

The main reason that deals fall apart before they hit a closing table? Unrealistic expectations

 

Business buyers and business sellers come into the business transaction process with an idea in their head of how that transaction is going to go and what they will get out of the deal. The problem with this initial vision is they are almost always an impossible reality. Businesses and business transactions are complicated, messy and involve many moving parts and personalities. Considering your business transaction with a focus on reality will help you immensely in having a successful sale or purchase.

 

 

First and foremost, there is no possible way that you are going to get everything you want. If you are buying a good business, you are not going to get it for a rock-bottom price. If you are selling, you are not going to get 10 times what businesses like yours are actually selling for. Business deals are full of negotiation – and not just about price. You will have to negotiate things like the length of due diligence, the length of the training period, the terms for seller financing, the clauses of a new lease – the list goes on. Be realistic in the negotiation phase of your business transaction. Go in knowing that there will need to be a lot of give and take from both sides of the transaction if you are going to get a deal done.

 

Another major issue that requires a reality check? We’ve already mentioned it – personalities.

 

There are a lot of people in a business transaction. There is a seller, a buyer, a couple of business brokers, business transaction attorneys, CPAs, landlords and property managers – and each one of these people will be seeing the transaction unfold from their own unique point of view. You need to be realistic because there are going to be times during the negotiation that one or more of these personalities are going to clash. For the most part, differing opinions can be sorted out, but only if all sides stay in the negotiation. Going into your business transaction with the understanding that problems will absolutely be a part of the game will help you see the end goal instead of focusing on temporary personality clashes.

 

Keep your expectations in the realm of reality and you will have a much better chance of reaching a closing table.

 

Are you thinking about selling your business and are curious about what businesses like yours have actually sold for? Would you like more information on the process to buy a business? Please feel free to leave any questions or comments here and we would be happy to help.

 

 

 

Michael Monnot

941.518.7138
Mike@InfinityBusinessBrokers.com
5111 Ocean Boulevard, Suite E
Siesta Key, FL 34242

www.InfinityBusinessBrokers.com

No Comments »




Unexpected Problems: What To Do When Your New Business Gets Sticky

You’re a brand new business owner and you’ve successfully navigated the path of purchasing a business. You took your time and really delved in during due diligence. You paid close attention during training with the seller and took copious notes. You’re pretty sure you’ve got the hang of this new business, and that you know everything about it.

 

 

Until you don’t.

 

Suddenly there’s an unforeseen problem. Something you didn’t find during due diligence. Something that happened out of the blue.

 

What can you do?

 

It depends. If a seller purposefully withheld something like a fatal flaw you will likely have some kind of recourse. If this is the case, call your business broker and discuss what options are available.

 

What if it’s not a secret fatal flaw? Then what?

 

Roll up your sleeves and get to work. Business ownership is tough stuff, and sometimes no matter what’s being thrown at you – you just have to find a way to persevere.

 

For instance, say you just bought a restaurant. Shortly after you take over the whole staff quits because they can no longer get away with things the previous owner allowed. Although a potentially rough situation, it can be solved by working some shifts yourself while you hire new staff or temporarily limiting the restaurant’s hours until you can right the ship.

 

What’s important to remember when you hit those initial and inevitable bumps in the road is no business is perfect and no business is smooth sailing. You are going to encounter problems – your success or failure as a business owner depends on what you do when faced with those problems.

 

It is also important to remember that the buck ultimately stops with you. If you aren’t willing to work with a staff who wants to get away with whatever they want – it’s not the previous owner’s fault when that staff quits en masse. It’s yours. Deal with the fallout and do what you need to do to get a new staff in place. Business buyers who sit on their hands and blame everyone but themselves are probably going to have a hard time as entrepreneurs.

 

The message here is you can research all you want and learn all you can about your new business and still end up with unexpected problems right out of the gate. Just remember that with some thought and hard work you and your new business can overcome anything.

 

Are you considering buying a business and want to know what recourse you might have if a seller hides issues? Do you want to know more about how you can find and deal with potential issues during due diligence? Ask us! Please leave any questions or comments, we would be happy to help.

 

 

 

Michael Monnot

941.518.7138
Mike@InfinityBusinessBrokers.com
5111 Ocean Boulevard, Suite E
Siesta Key, FL 34242

www.InfinityBusinessBrokers.com

 

 

No Comments »




Is It Crazy? Help With Business Listing Prices

 

If you’re new to the business buying marketplace you will probably notice something right out of the gate as you begin your search – listing prices seem like they’re all over the map. 

 

How are you supposed to figure out if the listing price is fair?

 

While initially confusing, the listing prices of businesses can and do make sense in most cases – you just need to know how to look at the number the seller wants objectively.

 

Your best bet as a new buyer is to get some professional expertise on your side. Talk to a qualified business broker about some of the business prices you’ve seen and ask for their input. The listing price of a business can be a very nuanced thing. It’s often based on cash flow, but sometimes metrics like industry standard multiples, values of equipment and inventory, what comparable businesses have recently sold for, etc. can be part of the equation that leads to a listing price. Experienced eyes will be necessary to tease out the important details and help you decide if what a seller wants is fair – or well beyond the realm of reality. 

 

Why would someone list a business for a crazy high price? Sometimes those sellers are more interested in being told what they want to hear than they are interested in selling. Sometimes they are listing just to see if someone will make them an offer. In some cases these sellers will negotiate with buyers who come up with a fair and justifiable offer, but if they won’t – it’s probably time to move on. An extreme price can be a red flag that it will be very difficult to put a deal together. 

 

A realistic seller will be able to back up the number they’ve asked for. They will have the financial documentation that shows their request is legitimate. These sellers are willing to negotiate when presented with a fair offer, because ultimately a business is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it. This does not mean that you as a buyer should throw extreme low-ball offers to see if they stick. A small business is someone’s blood, sweat and tears. The personal attachment to all of that work means that it is relatively easy to offend a seller to the point that they will refuse to work with you. Just as you would like the listing process to be fair – you need to return the favor and offer a fair price. 

 

The message here? Enlisting some professional guidance will be essential in helping you navigate the listing prices of the businesses on the market. Once you’ve determined that a business is what you want – put together a fair and justifiable offer. 

 

Are you just starting your business search and want to know what’s out there? Click here to search for current listings! Would you like to know more about how businesses are priced? Ask us! Please feel free to leave any questions or comments and we would be happy to help.

 

 

 

Michael Monnot

941.518.7138
Mike@InfinityBusinessBrokers.com
5111 Ocean Boulevard, Suite E
Siesta Key, FL 34242

www.InfinityBusinessBrokers.com

No Comments »




What Can You Realistically Afford? Thoughts For Business Buyers

We all have big dreams. A bigger house. A nicer car. Lavish vacations. Your own private island. What keeps these wonderful flights of fancy in the realm of dreams is the fact that we just can’t (currently) make them happen.

 

 

Big dreams can become a big problem in the small business market. Why?

 

New buyers will often consider businesses that are completely out of their price range – like drastically so.

 

Why do many new business buyers have unrealistic expectations? It may be, in part, because of the way people buy homes.

 

When you go into a bank to get a mortgage, you might walk out with a pre-approval for $750,000. Does that mean you have $750,000 in the bank in cash? Nope. It just means the bank is willing to loan you that amount because they can take back your new house as collateral if you don’t pay them back.

 

Small business transactions don’t work that way. There are financing options if you don’t have a huge amount of cash available – but that financing is very different than what you see in the housing market. You might be able to get a loan from the Small Business Administration (SBA) or from the seller of the business via seller financing – but no matter where you get your loan you are going to have to put up a large down payment and prove that you have the capital to both get through the transaction process and sustain yourself as the new owner of the business.

 

What do we mean by that? The business buying process can be expensive. If you get a loan from the SBA, they are going to require an appraisal of the business – one you as the buyer have to pay for. There are application fees for SBA, as well as application and licensing costs associated with the licensing requirements for your new business. If your future business is in a commercial space, your new landlord is going to want first-last-security and to see your financials to assure them you can not only pay those initial costs, but be able to pay your rent going forward. You might need capital for payroll in the first few weeks or months. The list can be long and pricey.

 

This doesn’t mean you can’t fulfill your dream of buying your own business. It just means you need to be realistic with what you can afford. If you only have $50,000 to spend, you shouldn’t even look at a business that is $750,000. It can’t happen. What you can do is find an affordable business that you can grow. Smaller, more affordable businesses can be very successful – and have lots of room for that all-important growth.  

 

If you want to know what you can realistically afford, ask an experienced and qualified business broker. They can look at your current financial situation, your goals for business ownership and your previous experience – then assist you with finding the right business to buy. The right business will both meet your goals and keep you from extending yourself beyond what is currently financially possible.

 

Have you always wanted to buy a business but aren’t sure what you could afford? Would you like to know what types of businesses are currently on the market in your price range? Ask us! Leave any questions or comments and we would be happy to help.

 

 

 

Michael Monnot

941.518.7138
Mike@InfinityBusinessBrokers.com
5111 Ocean Boulevard, Suite E
Siesta Key, FL 34242

www.InfinityBusinessBrokers.com

No Comments »




Get Ready For The Google: Why Buyers Need To Think About Their Online Reputation

You have the capital ready, you’ve found a business you like and you are ready to write the check. The seller finds out who you are and then suddenly the deal is dead. What happened?

 

They Googled you.

 

When you buy a small business, you are buying something that the former owner spent their blood, sweat and tears for. You are getting the employees they care about, the business reputation they built. Who you are as a person, what you bring to the table in terms of stability and the ability to cement the future of the business they care about matters. It matters more than you may have considered.

 

While you and a business seller don’t have to be best friends or even agree on most things that occur outside the realm of running the business, what your online reputation says about you absolutely has the potential to sink a deal.

 

Try this. Look yourself up. What’s out there with your name attached?

 

Most people don’t have the celebrity-esque issue of having negative news articles all over the internet. That isn’t the problem. What most people have is their social media life. Your Facebook page. Your YouTube channel. Your Twitter account. Your blog. While this realm of your social life was probably intended to be for personal use only, it will absolutely impact the way a business seller thinks about you. It might even make them decide they don’t want you to buy their business.

 

But my LinkedIn page is very professional. Isn’t that the one that matters?

 

Not really. While most people aren’t posting long political rants or inappropriate memes on their “professional” online profiles – many people do on “personal” sites. The problem? Those personal thoughts, jokes and comments can be just as easy to find as your carefully curated professional page.

 

What can you do about it? Google yourself long before a prospective business seller does. See what’s public and make it private. Find what, in retrospect, wouldn’t be considered appropriate for a professional reputation and delete it. Clean up your online presence – immediately.

 

You would do a similar purge of your online presence before applying for a new job, as it is common knowledge that employers absolutely look people up – and there are many, many stories of poorly thought out posts sinking employment opportunities. The same protocol should be in place when you buy a business because you are essentially buying yourself a job. Do the work ahead of time and curate your entire public online presence before it’s too late.

 

Have you considered your online reputation s a business buyer? Would you like to know more about what business sellers are looking for in a prospective buyer? Ask us! Leave any questions or comments and we would be happy to help.

 

 

 

Michael Monnot

941.518.7138
Mike@InfinityBusinessBrokers.com
5111 Ocean Boulevard, Suite E
Siesta Key, FL 34242

www.InfinityBusinessBrokers.com

 

No Comments »




All The Way To The Finish Line – Why You Need A Great Broker

 

Both parties have agreed on the purchase contract, you’re finished – right?

 

Not quite, and if you have a business broker who isn’t going to push your deal all the way to the finish line – then your deal could be in trouble. 

 

A contract does not mean the deal is done, it just means one step in the process has been completed. We have a very high closure rate once our deals get to contract – 70-80%, but most business brokers can’t get anywhere near that number.

 

Why?

 

Once the contract piece of the puzzle is done, many brokers walk away and let the deal fend for itself. They let things like licensing, SBA loan issues and follow-thru with details fall by the wayside – and when this happens a minor issue can become a major deal-breaker in no time.

 

A transaction isn’t closed until it’s closed.

 

Why would any broker let this happen? Once the contract is put together, most brokers think that their work is done, but the last few details are often the most important. Our process is different because we do an immense amount of pre-due diligence. We have all of the ducks in a row and have rooted out and dealt with many of the issues that come up at the end long before they become potential deal killers. Then, we don’t stop until the deal is done.

 

Let’s focus on just one of the often-overlooked last-minute details to give you an example of the importance of getting all those final ducks in a row:

 

If you as a buyer have no idea what the licensing requirements are for the business you are about to take over, how can you possibly have all of those requirements complete on the day you get handed the keys? Any business transaction means that at the very least all licensing must be transferred from the old owner to the new, and many of these licenses come with an inspection requirement that needs to be fulfilled before the business can serve customers. What does that mean if you don’t complete the necessary applications and inspections before the day you take over? You can’t open the doors until they are all complete, so having a broker who is on top of issues like licensing will be crucial for a successful transaction.

 

If you are a seller who offered seller financing, then it is in your best interest for the transition to the new owner to go smoothly. An incomplete licensing, permitting or inspection requirement will put the transition and the future of the business in jeopardy (meaning you won’t be able to get paid). Having a broker who is proactive on the licensing front (and all other fronts, for that matter) will mean a more successful transition to the new ownership and a far better chance for the new owner to find success right out of the gate.

 

Ask your broker how many of their deals make it to closing once the contract step has been reached. Their answer to this question will tell you all you need to know about their follow-through and whether or not you’ll be able to make it to the closing table.

 

Are you buying a business and want to know more about the process to transfer licenses? Are you selling your business and would like to know what aspects of your transaction will need to be followed all the way to the end? Please feel free to leave any questions or comments and we will be happy to help.

 

 

 

Michael Monnot

941.518.7138
Mike@InfinityBusinessBrokers.com
12995 South Cleveland Avenue, Suite 249
Fort Myers, FL 33907

www.InfinityBusinessBrokers.com

 

No Comments »




Looking To Buy? An Essential Business Might Be For You

 

It’s something that we’ve discussed in these articles many times – the need to base the decision of what business would be right for you not on aesthetics, but on whether or not the business meets your goals for business ownership. Many of us have a picture in our head of what our ideal business would look like, but that doesn’t mean that type of business is going to be a good choice.  

 

Now that we are all living in the pandemic-led business climate – that picture in your head may need to shift.

 

Shift to what? An essential business.  

 

Our current reality has thrown a bright spotlight on those businesses that are essential for everyone – to eat, maintain basic hygiene, get adequate medical care, protect themselves, etc. What does this mean to you if you’re a business buyer? That perhaps a wise choice for business ownership is a business that everyone needs. Delivery services, food and beverage based retail, online shopping and the manufacturing of supplies are all good avenues right now.

 

The ability to pivot in times like these is often the difference between success and failure. Although you may have had your heart set on a particular type of business, reality might mean you need to shift your business choice based on achieving your business ownership goals – instead of chasing the picture you had in your head.

 

This doesn’t mean you can’t buy your dream business. It does mean you need to reevaluate why that business was your dream business in the first place.

 

Were you considering that type of business because it seemed like a fun lifestyle? The perceived lifestyle of a business owner is often drastically different from reality – so ask yourself what about that perceived lifestyle is so appealing? Is it the ability to set your own hours? Is it the ability to work from home? Is it the amount of money you will be able to make? Again, what are you hoping to get out of business ownership? The answer to that question might point you in a direction you hadn’t considered – and the smart buy would be an essential business in that direction that meets your goals.

 

What if the business I’m considering isn’t currently functioning as an essential business, but could be? As the new owner you can absolutely implement your own ideas that can both help your local community and keep your business in good shape.

 

Are you looking at buying a cafe? Perhaps you could implement a drive-up system for take-out or hire a temporary delivery driver. Are you looking at a retail store? Stock the items that people currently need and offer curb-side pickup and/or delivery as well. Are you considering a manufacturing business? What does the local economy currently need? Could you divert some of your resources to fulfill that current need? You get the idea.

 

As a soon-to-be small business owner you need to be thinking about how to keep your new venture in the black in these unprecedented times. Creativity and the willingness to pivot when a sudden shift is needed will likely mean the difference between success and failure in the new normal. The same attributes will also mean a possible reevaluation of your prospective business choices.

 

Are you considering buying a business but aren’t sure now is the right time? Does the current situation have you thinking an essential business might be right for you? Please feel free to contact us today. We would be happy to help you make the best decision for you. Leave us any questions or comments!

 

 

 

Michael Monnot

941.518.7138
Mike@InfinityBusinessBrokers.com
12995 South Cleveland Avenue, Suite 249
Fort Myers, FL 33907

www.InfinityBusinessBrokers.com

No Comments »




Michael Monnot

941.518.7138
Mike@InfinityBusinessBrokers.com

5111-E Ocean Blvd
Siesta Key, FL 34242




Search



Recent Posts

Categories

Archives

Tags