What Businesses Are Selling? The BizBuySell Insight Report



Have a business in restaurant, retail or service industries?

 

2015Q2_Small_Business_Sales_by_Sector

 

In the second quarter of 2015, those three industries alone accounted for 90% of closed transactions. The time to get your service, retail or restaurant industry business on the market is now, while your industry is in such high demand! Contact us today to get listed and SOLD.

 

 

Michael Monnot

941.518.7138
Mike@infinitybusinessbrokers.com
12995 South Cleveland Avenue, Suite 249
Fort Myers, FL 33907

http://www.infinitybusinessbrokers.com


Selling Price and Asking Price The BizBuySell Insight Report



If selling your business is something you are considering, the newest look at the BizBuySell Insight Report for the most recent quarter of 2015 shows once again that the time to sell is now.

 

2015Q2_Small_Business_Sale_Price_vs_Asking_Price

 

 

The median asking price and the median sale price are up and consistent since the last quarter of 2014, but this peak may not last – especially considering the large number of baby boomer owned businesses slated to hit the market in the near future. Hit the wave while it’s in the seller’s favor and get your business listed today!

 

 

Michael Monnot

941.518.7138
Mike@infinitybusinessbrokers.com
12995 South Cleveland Avenue, Suite 249
Fort Myers, FL 33907

http://www.infinitybusinessbrokers.com


Taking A Page From Interviewing 101: Why Buyers Should Come Prepared



Basic interview skills are a bit of a no-brainer, especially if you aren’t new to the world of the working. Whether you’re applying for a new job at a new company or being interviewed for a promotion within your current place of employment – you know that you need to do some leg work and prepare before you are sitting across from an interviewer. You will need to know some basic information about the job you are applying for, have pre-prepared answers to common interview questions and have some creative questions of your own to ask the interviewer themselves to stand out from the crowd. You get the drill.

 

Stressful people waiting for job interview

 

What is totally shocking about buyers in the small business market is they rarely, if ever, do the same kind of preparation for meetings with sellers.

 

Why is this shocking? When you buy yourself a business, you are essentially buying yourself a job, so coming up with questions and getting those questions answered before you ultimately make a purchase decision seems like the sensible thing to do.

 

True, you are not typically trying to impress a seller so they will hire you – but initial meetings and conference calls with sellers allows you the opportunity to vet a business long before you write a very big check, so why wouldn’t you come prepared?

 

What should you be asking? The questions you ask will depend on the type of business you are looking to buy, but there are a few general questions you should always ask.

 

When you buy a business you are essentially buying cash flow, so questions about how the business makes money will be very important.

 

How is income derived?

How much did the owner take home last year?

What were the gross and net profits of the business?

How much of the profit was reinvested in the business?

 

Other questions, equally important as the questions about financial matters, deal with the fact that entrepreneurship isn’t just a job, it’s a way of life. You will have no idea what lifestyle you will be inheriting from the current owner unless you ask, and the answers to these questions that are undefined by black and white numbers will also help reveal any red flags.

 

For instance, if the question “what aspect of the business keeps you up at a night?” gets an answer of “absolutely nothing” – you know you are being lied to. All small business ownership comes with a fair amount of stress because the buck stops with you.

 

In addition to more traditional financial questions, try asking questions like these about your future life.

 

What does a typical work day look like for the owner?

What about a work week?

How often do you take vacations?

How long are you comfortable leaving the business in the hands of the staff – hours, days, never?

How many hours do you work on a typical day?

Do you work weekends, holidays?

If you had all the time and money in the world, what would you do with that time and money to grow or change the business?

What has prevented you from making those desired changes a reality?

 

The message here is to treat all of those years of interview preparations as a primer for your conversations with business sellers. Asking questions during those crucial first conversations can save you a lot of wasted time and energy by weeding out the businesses that aren’t going to fit with your goals for business ownership.

 

Don’t waste the opportunity – ask questions!

 

Are you looking for a business to buy and want to know more about the types of questions you should be asking? Do you have questions about what other answers you should consider as red flags? Ask us! Leave any comments or questions here, and we will be happy to help.

 

 

 

Michael Monnot

941.518.7138
Mike@infinitybusinessbrokers.com
12995 South Cleveland Avenue, Suite 249
Fort Myers, FL 33907

http://www.infinitybusinessbrokers.com


White House Memo Recognizes Immigrants as Innovators



By Guest Contributor Sabine Weyergraf – www.weyergrafimmigraiton.com

 

Button idea bulb business web

 

According to a July 2015 White House memo, “Modernizing our visa system to meet the needs of the 21st century is critical to ensuring that we continue to reap the cultural and economic benefits of an immigration system that encourages innovators and entrepreneurs to build lives in the United States and contribute their vitality and creativity to our economy.”

 

This is a special report that reviews a number of initiatives that are underway or will be underway to revise the U.S. legal immigration system and make it more efficient and effective.

 

The report highlighted a number of findings in a 2010 study by Jennifer Hunt and Marjolaine Gauthier-Loiselle. Their research confirms that immigrants are exceptional workers and innovators, and often highly entrepreneurial.

 

Their entrepreneurial spirit helps them to start businesses that create job opportunities for millions of Americans.

 

Some of the study’s findings include:

  • 25 percent of companies backed by venture capital between 1991 and 2006 were started by immigrants.
  • Immigrants started a quarter of engineering and technology companies founded between 1995 and 2005.
  • In May 2012, the Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Office of Advocacy found that immigrants have high business formation rates and create successful businesses that hire immigrant and U.S citizen employees and export goods and services.
  • The study found that immigrants file patents at two times the rate of U.S.-born workers. This may have a direct correlation to immigrants’ relatively heavy representation in science, engineering, and other technical occupations. However, analysis revealed that immigrants in those fields patent at an above-average rate even when compared to other U.S.-born scientists and engineers.
  • Hunt and Gauthier-Loiselle found that high-skilled immigration has significant spillover effects. The rate of patenting by U.S.-born innovators doubles in response to a one percentage-point increase in the percentage of immigrant college graduates.
  • Encouraging high-skilled immigration can increase the rate of technological innovation in the United States, increasing the productivity of American workers and growing the economy.
  • Even outside the high-tech sector, immigrants are more than twice as likely to form new businesses in a given month compared to U.S-born individuals, according to the 2012 SBA report, and immigrants are significantly more likely to run a company with more than 10 workers.
  • A study by the Partnership for a New American Economy reported that more than 40 percent of Fortune 500 companies were founded by immigrants or their children. The study also noted that these companies are responsible for many jobs here and abroad—employing more than 10 million people worldwide—and that they generate annual revenues of $4.2 trillion.

 

The decision to immigrate is a complex one. The United States is a magnet for skilled immigrants who bring their innovation and entrepreneurship to grow our economy and create jobs for all Americans. The United States has flexible labor markets that are able to integrate immigrants relatively quickly. The country also recognizes the skill premium where exceptional ability and willingness to work hard are compensated in the form of higher income, education and job training.

 

 

Heandshot_Sabine_WeyergrafLogo_Weyergraf_page_001
Sabine Weyergraf is founding partner and New York licensed attorney practicing solely immigration law with Weyergraf Immigration, PA in Sarasota, Florida.
Contact: 941-706-4102, sabine@weyergrafimmigration.com

This article is provided for general informational purposes and does not constitute legal advice.

 

 

Michael Monnot

941.518.7138
Mike@infinitybusinessbrokers.com
12995 South Cleveland Avenue, Suite 249
Fort Myers, FL 33907

http://www.infinitybusinessbrokers.com

 



Michael Monnot

941.518.7138
Mike@InfinityBusinessBrokers.com

12995 South Cleveland Avenue, Suite 249
Fort Myers, FL 33907

Michael Monnot

941.518.7138
Mike@InfinityBusinessBrokers.com

12995 South Cleveland Avenue, Suite 249
Fort Myers, FL 33907




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